Read The Plaque https://readtheplaque.com Always read the plaque en-us Island of Refuge https://readtheplaque.com/plaque/island-of-refuge https://readtheplaque.com/plaque/island-of-refuge 2024-07-23 17:48:09.359924 Island of Refuge Island of Refuge

]]>
Honoring Brian Kemble https://readtheplaque.com/plaque/honoring-brian-kemble https://readtheplaque.com/plaque/honoring-brian-kemble 2024-07-23 17:47:46.868378 Honoring Brian Kemble Honoring Brian Kemble

]]>
Marcheta Bowdle https://readtheplaque.com/plaque/marcheta-bowdle https://readtheplaque.com/plaque/marcheta-bowdle 2024-07-23 17:47:30.252141 Marcheta Bowdle Marcheta Bowdle

]]>
Vashon Island - Dockton - Agriculture https://readtheplaque.com/plaque/vashon-island-dockton-agriculture https://readtheplaque.com/plaque/vashon-island-dockton-agriculture 2024-07-22 21:00:10.188974 Vashon Island - Dockton - Agriculture Vashon Island - Dockton - Agriculture

"We got 60 cents per flat for currants and U cents a flat for raspberries. You turned your ticket in at the general store owned at that time by Mr. and Mrs. Berry." - John Friars AGRICULTURE [8] Although the early Scandinavian and Croatian settlers mostly came to Dockton to work in the dry dock, many supplemented their family income first by fishing and later by farming. Land in Dockton was relatively cheap in the early days and many families acquired five- and ten-acre plots adjacent to their homes and slowly cleared the land for gardens and later for fruit orchards. Currants, gooseberries, loganberries and cherry trees were the primary crops until after World War II. While the men were away fishing during the summers, the women supervised the fields, managed the harvest and handled the business side of the farms. Harvesting was a community affair. Each farm had its loyal "pickers" made up of neighbors, adults and children. Early each morning they would gather at the fields and be assigned rows. They would often pick until noon unless a crop was overripe, then they would pick all arternoon. As each picker filled a flat (twelve boxes) they were given a ticket. A good picker could fill ten flats in a morning. At the end of the season, usually after the fishermen had returned, a picker would go to the farm family and exchange their tickets for money. Usually coffee and sweets were offered as the whole process was a family affair. For those who couldn't wait, especially the children, Theo Berry, owner of the Dockton store; would redeem the tickets which bought two popsicles! STRAWBERRY CAPITAL By the 1920's, Vashon had become known as the "Strawberry Capital.” Near the end of World War II, Theo Berry and his son-in-law, Donald Johnson, developed a large tract of land on upper Maury Island into the largest strawberry field on the island. They converted the former Shipyard Hotel/ School into a cannery and controlled their business from field to consumer. Competition from California growers and increased transportation costs with the decline of the Mosquito Fleet, brought an end to commercial farming in Dockton Side Box: Dockton residents were hardworking, enterprising people who built a strong community with respect for ethnic and religious differences.

]]>
Vashon - Dockton - The Dockton Store https://readtheplaque.com/plaque/vashon-dockton-the-dockton-store https://readtheplaque.com/plaque/vashon-dockton-the-dockton-store 2024-07-22 20:59:51.097001 Vashon - Dockton - The Dockton Store Vashon - Dockton - The Dockton Store

THE DOCKTON STORE [9] "Toward the back of the store there was a large round wood-stove. It was quite often the gathering place. On a cold day we would all warm up by the stove before venturing on home. The teenagers would meet the 6:30 p.m. boat, walk up from the dock to the store and wait for the mail to be distributed. It gave them a chance to socialize." - Helen Bogunovich Puz Early supplies for the residents of Dockton were brought by each family by boat from Tacoma. In 1903, Albert Neilson started a store on the waterfront near the dry dock. He was also the first postmaster. Prior to the dry dock leaving, he sold the store to Lawrence Turnbull, who relocated the store to the present site. In 1919, Theo Berry purchased the store and became the postmaster. During Mr. Berry's ownership, the store was the post office, gas station, grocery, meat market, hardware store and community center. Mail arrived twice a day by way of steamer from Tacoma. Mr. Berry often supplied groceries to the local fishermen and their families on credit until the fall of each year and the end of the fishing season. When bills were paid, the customers were given a bag of candy or several yards of material to make a dress. In the 1950's, Mary and Don Johnson took over the store. Later, Jerry and Betty Plancich bought the store and were the proprietors for many years. Side Box: Today, the store is a private residence and remains on the National Registry for Historic Places.

]]>
Performance Pest Management https://readtheplaque.com/plaque/performance-pest-management https://readtheplaque.com/plaque/performance-pest-management 2024-07-22 18:28:51.329098 Performance Pest Management Performance Pest Management

]]>
Rancho Los Putos https://readtheplaque.com/plaque/rancho-los-putos https://readtheplaque.com/plaque/rancho-los-putos 2024-07-22 18:28:38.002664 Rancho Los Putos Rancho Los Putos

]]>
Pena Adobe Park https://readtheplaque.com/plaque/pena-adobe-park https://readtheplaque.com/plaque/pena-adobe-park 2024-07-22 18:28:23.584731 Pena Adobe Park Pena Adobe Park

]]>
Lagoon Valley https://readtheplaque.com/plaque/lagoon-valley https://readtheplaque.com/plaque/lagoon-valley 2024-07-22 18:28:07.921328 Lagoon Valley Lagoon Valley

]]>
Celiron-- Birthplace of Lucy https://readtheplaque.com/plaque/celiron-birthplace-of-lucy https://readtheplaque.com/plaque/celiron-birthplace-of-lucy 2024-07-22 18:27:31.364657 Celiron-- Birthplace of Lucy Celiron-- Birthplace of Lucy

Plaque is located in a lakefront park where there are two sculptures of Lucille Ball, one notoriously known as “Ugly Lucy.” Lucy grew up in Celeron. The plaque location was once an amusement park. In Honor Of All our villagers who fought Courageously in all wars and conflicts CELORON Incorporated 1896 Named for the explorer JOSEPH PIERRE CELORON de BLAINVILLE who passed tgrough this area in 1749 And in commemoration Celoron Amusement Park 1894-1962 Once a recreation mecca for all Presented 1972 by the Celoron American Legion Herman Kent Post 777

]]>